Helge Scherlund's eLearning News

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Check out the weblog every day and keep up-to-date on the latest news and information about flexible, netbased learning and teaching, e-learning, blended learning, distance learning and m-learning. Links to the best web pages on the internet, articles etc. and conferences and seminars about e-learning. Mediation of knowledge and experiences within research and development of the modern digital, interactive media. I hope that you find this service useful and have a good time reading!

URL: http://scherlund.blogspot.com/

Aggiornato: 1 giorno 11 ore fa

The math way of life | Education - The Hindu

National Mathematics Day is observed on December 22.
When taught effectively, students come to love the subject and subsequently benefit from its long-term positive consequences, as The Hindu reports. 

Photo: The Hindu
Being a mathematics and physics teacher, I have had the privilege of interacting with thousands of parents and students from diverse backgrounds. Also, being a part of one of the world’s largest education companies, I have also had the opportunity of interacting with some of the finest educators from around the world.

In all of these conversations, a question I am asked often is why, despite a rich ancient mathematics culture, India does not produce great mathematicians. Is it a reflection of the quality of math education in the country? Does it demonstrate a common aptitude amongst Indians? Is there a ‘gene’ that determines whether you excel in this subject or not? Well, I have a slightly different way of looking at it and I believe there is no better time to share this than with the National Mathematics Day around the corner on December 22.

Being good at math versus being a good mathematician are two very different things. A mathematician is someone who is a specialist or an expert and is most likely pursuing research in this field. Being ‘good at math’, however, can be evaluated in various ways...

Tackling the fear
While the importance of math is uncontested, I see a common aversion to this subject across students of all age groups, especially young adults. Traditionally, maths has been taught in an abstract manner which makes it one of the ‘most feared’ subjects. Understanding and exploring math concepts is still driven by the fear of exams instead of the love for the subject. In fact, the fear of maths continues to live through most of our adult lives too.
Read more... 

Source: The Hindu

8 Scholarships From Top Ranking Universities For Data Science That Students Can Apply In 2019 | Education - Analytics India Magazine

Note: To get admission in foreign universities/Institutes mentioned above fulfilling English language eligibility through (TOEFL or IELTS) is must.
Studying data science, artificial intelligence, machine learning and related technologies in a foreign university might be an expensive affair, notes Martin F.R., aspiring journalist.

Photo: Analytics India Magazine
While there are a lot of sources available on the courses one can opt for in Data Science, it is hard to find detailed information about the scholarship for specialised courses. In this article, we list down top 8 scholarships that aspiring data science candidates can apply for in 2019. 

The article aims to list down scholarships available in top-ranking universities and should not be deemed as a comprehensive list. 
Read more...

Source: Analytics India Magazine

Can't find data scientists? Don't worry about it | Artificial Intelligence - ZDNet

Bob Violino, freelance writer reports, New study says five factors are democratizing data science, potentially easing the talent shortage.

Photo: ZDNet

It's no secret that data scientists continue to be among the most sought-after professionals in all of IT. As organizations continue to look for ways to gain value and insights from their data, these are the people they frequently turn to in order to make sense of all the information pouring into their systems from a growing number of sources.

The good news for companies desperate to find these needed skill sets is that data science is becoming "democratized," which will help bridge the talent gap.

Five factors are democratizing data science and putting this critical capability into the hands of more professionals, potentially alleviating the crippling talent shortage, according to a report released today from consulting firm Deloitte.
Read more... 

Source: ZDNet

Understanding the Future of Humans, AI and Quantum Computers | Artificial Intelligence - Next Big Future

I believe it is likely that we will have 10,000 qubit quantum computers within 5 to 10 years, observes Brian Wang, business-oriented futurist, speaker and author of emerging and disruptive technologies.

Photo: Next Big FutureThere is rapidly advancing work by IonQ with trapped ion quantum computers and a range of superconducting quantum computer systems by Google, IBM, Intel, Rigetti and 2000-5000 qubit quantum annealing computers by D-Wave Systems.

10,000 qubit quantum computers should have computing capabilities far beyond any conventional computer for certain classes of problems. They will be beyond not just any regular computer today but any non-quantum computer ever for those kinds of problems.

Those quantum computers will help improve artificial intelligence systems. How certain is this development? What will it mean for humans and our world?

A Lot of Money, 
Many Approaches, Many Companies The other Google, IBM, Intel and Rigetti systems should be at 100-300 qubits in 2019. There will billions of dollar funding existing and new quantum computing efforts in the USA and China.

There will be a range of technologies beyond trapped ion and multiple categories of superconducting quantum computer technologies...

Will Powerful Quantum Computer Be in Everything? 
The power of quantum computers is such that most people do not have a use for quantum computers. 
We cannot properly form or understand advanced mathematics, physics or science to take advantage of quantum computing power.

Is computing power limiting what questions people can get answered? 
Read more... 

Source: Next Big Future

Mathematics books you can count on for Christmas | Reviews - E&T Magazine

Dominic Lenton, Managing Editor says, More gift ideas from E&T, this time looking at recent titles that take a less than serious approach to the world of numbers. 

Photo: DreamstimeThere’s a point somewhere between GCSEs and being baffled by how much school maths has changed when you’re trying to help your own children with homework, when a book about the history and theory of numbers becomes a welcome gift and not a big disappointment. It’s become a popular enough genre that there’s a steady stream of books aimed at readers who might regret not paying more attention in class and we’ve rounded up a few recent ones.
Read more

Source: E&T Magazine

Katen taking college class via robot | Syracuse Journal-Democrat

Through learning centers and distance learning programs, Southeast Community College puts a lot of effort into reaching out to students, some of whom can’t make it to the campus at Lincoln, Beatrice or Milford, according to Kirt Manion, Senior Writer at GateHouse Media.

SCC Class by Robot
 

The latest effort—taking class via robot.
 
Cassie Katen, a senior home-schooled high school student from Nebraska City, is already getting some college experience thanks to a robotic presence on the Beatrice campus.
 
Katen, a future business administration student in the collegiate world, is taking a college level English class through a program at the Nebraska City Distance Learning Center at SCC at 819 Central Ave.
 
Tammy Atha, Katen’s instructor, said she remembers getting the notification that she would have a robot student in class.
 
At first, Atha admits the idea of teaching to a robot presence was intimidating...

SCC Robots
The robot program is funded through a Rural Development Grant from the United States Department of Agriculture. SCC was awarded $120,582. So far, six learning center students have taken advantage of the program at the Lincoln and Beatrice campuses.
 
Christopher Cummins, director of Instructional Technology and Virtual Learning at SCC, tested the robots prior to the start of classes. He says overall it’s been a success with some minor issues.
 
“The robot is designed to take some punishment, so it’s pretty sturdy,” Cummins said. “We had a (robot) student fall over in class. The camera fell off and the student’s view was in portrait mode until they put the camera back on. One of the students just picked her back up. Students in the classrooms and in the halls are constantly snapping selfies or wishing the student ‘good luck’ on their way to class. It’s been very positive.“ 
Read more...

Source: Syracuse Journal-Democrat and Nebraska City News Press Channel (YouTube)

Reflecting on 2018, and (Tentatively) Projecting the Future | Digital Learning - Inside Higher Ed

Mark Lieberman, Digital Learning Reporter at Inside Higher Ed summarizes, A new online institution, a transforming textbook market, shifting landscapes for MOOCs and alternative credentials, increasing interest in mobile, and more. Experts make sense of a convoluted year.
 
Photo: Istockphoto.com/HAKINMHAN
Just like that, another year is almost over. If it's been as much of a whirlwind for you as it has for us, you're likely struggling to make sense of all that changed on the digital learning landscape this year.

Our second annual year-end recap is here to help. We gathered some of the most thoughtful observers of the field to ask these three questions:
  • What digital learning development from the past 12 months (either a specific piece of news or a trend) will we still be talking about five years from now?
  • Why is this development likely to stick around as a topic of conversation and a driver of innovation?
  • How will the conversation evolve in the coming years?
Here's what they said.
Read more... 

Source: Inside Higher Ed

Humans, machines and learning | Blog - Learning with 'e's

Take a closer look at Steve Wheeler's forthcoming book entitled "Digital Learning in Organizations: Help your Workforce Capitalize on Technology".

Digital Learning in Organizations:
Help your Workforce Capitalize on Technology One of the many topics I discuss in my forthcoming book is Artificial Intelligence (AI) and its potential impact on the future of learning and development. I, along with many others, believe this is an important subject to explore, because it is a rapidly growing area of technology that will significantly influence our future.
In particular, there are several philosophical debates about the nature of intelligence and how human intelligence differs from machine intelligence. One of the texts I draw from is Tegmark's Life 3.0. Here's an excerpt from the new book:

MIT physics professor Max Tegmark presents some compelling arguments for the future of AI. He argues that the benefits of AI will far surpass the threats, provided they are aligned to human intentions. One of the greatest concerns he reveals is not that computers might become sentient, or ‘evil’, but a scenario in which the goals of ‘competent’ AI become misaligned with ours. His key argument is that the discussion around whether or not computers will attain consciousness or emotional capability is spurious (Tegmark, 2017). Our future co-existence with technology will be premised on the ability of computers to make life better for humanity, not to out-think us. 

For Tegmark, intelligence, whether human or artificial, is being able to accomplish complex goals (whether those goals are good or bad). He argues that intelligence ultimately relies on information and computation, not on flesh and blood or on metal and plastic. Therefore, he reasons, with the exponential developments taking place in the world of technology, there is no barrier to computers eventually attaining and even surpassing human intelligence. Such a position can be described as ‘Strong AI’, or in Tegmark’s terms, the ‘Beneficial AI movement’.
Read more...

Source: Learning with 'e's (blog)

Michigan Tech Launches Online Program in Applied Statistics | Michigan Tech News

Michigan Technological University has launched an online graduate program in applied statistics to meet the growing industry demand for statisticians, inform Stefanie Sidortsova, Executive Director for Communications. 
Michigan Tech has launched a new online graduate program in applied statistics.

The program is designed to empower students with the data analysis skills to increase their competitiveness in the job market amidst the growing data revolution. Geared toward programmers, analysts, mathematicians and statisticians, the program is also useful for non-statistics graduates who 
want to enhance their applied-statistics knowledge base. 

The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that the demand for statisticians and related jobs will grow 33 percent by 2026. The industry will need an additional 13,500 candidates who are well versed in the science of data and applied statistics, to drive critical business decisions. Graduate programs like Michigan Tech’s online MS in Applied Statistics prepare students with these essential skills so they will be ready to solve real-world problems faced by organizations throughout the economy...

The MS in Applied Statistics has been launched in collaboration with Michigan Tech’s online program management partner, Keypath Education LLC. Michigan Tech also partnered with Keypath for the launch of its MS in Electrical Engineering and MS in Civil Engineering online programs earlier in 2018.  
Read more...

Source: Michigan Tech News

10 Things Everyone Should Know About Today's Students and Digital Learning | EdTech & Innovation - The Tech Edvocate

Technology has changed the way learning takes place in today’s education, writes Matthew Lynch, The Tech Edvocate.

Photo: Pexels
Technology has changed the way learning takes place in today’s education. Unlike the past where learning computers was a lesson among other lessons, digital technology is currently a classroom tool that enables students to study just any subject. It has also helped tutors to develop more interactive classes and engage the students in the running processes. Here are ten things that everyone should know about today’s students and digital learning...

Digital learning tools have enabled students to put their heads together in the digital space. They can now work on the same page exchanging ideas on the go better than in the traditional class. Collaboration increases comprehension and opens up their minds to new ideas.
Read more...

Recommended Reading

Photo: The Tech EdvocateWhat Are the Opportunities and Challenges of Digital Learning? by Matthew Lynch, The Tech Edvocate.

Source: The Tech Edvocate

These children can neither move nor speak. Clowns and engineers are trying to listen to their inner worlds | In the Lab - STAT

When they set out with their red noses, a ukulele, and a kazoo, the clowns had no intention of toying with the boundaries of consciousness. They just wanted to make sure they weren’t scaring any kids, observes Eric Boodman, general assignment reporter.

Therapeutic clowns Helen Donnelly (left) and Suzette Araujo visit Krystal, who has lived at Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital in Toronto for 15 years.
Photo: Chloë Ellingson for STATIt seemed unlikely. As clowns go, these two were pretty unscary: Ricky wore suspenders and a propeller-topped beanie, Dr. Flap wore a lab coat and an aviator’s cap, and neither used any makeup. Still, they knew that their audience’s wishes were too often overlooked, and wanted no part in that pattern.

For a therapeutic clown, silliness is serious business. Helen Donnelly, who personifies Dr. Flap, had spent years on stages and under big tops, traveling with Cirque du Soleil, doing solo shows, speaking made-up languages, dancing in front of clotheslines hung with cuts of meat. When she started working at Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital in Toronto, her absurdities took on a different aim: to transport kids out of the disorienting realities of medical treatment and into imaginary worlds where they had a sense of control.

“I’m so glad I’m just a professional idiot, I’m so glad I’m not a grownup,” she’ll say — but she’ll also tell you that she was among the first clowns in the world to make notes in medical records. She and her clowning partner round the wards alongside doctors and respiratory therapists. Their acts of tomfoolery are referred to as interventions, sometimes taking place during injections and wound-dressing changes.

The kids who first prompted Ricky and Dr. Flap’s concerns, back around 2007, were those who — for reasons of brain injury or birth defect, stroke, or seizure — could neither move nor speak. The pair had all sorts of tricks up their sleeves, devised for a whole range of differing abilities. They improvised songs and soundscapes. They juggled scarves. They blew great glistening bubbles and pretended to gobble them up...

Even while the device is still in development, parents see biomusic experiments as an opportunity not to be missed, the rare lens through which they might catch a glimpse — however fuzzy — of their kids’ inner worlds. All of that emerged from an encounter between some clowns and a Ph.D. student caught in the existential wilderness of a dissertation project gone awry.

By then, Blain-Moraes had already spent years of her doctoral research trying to decode what these kids might be feeling. She knew that spikes in emotion often came with physiological changes — a prickle of sweat, a quickening pulse — but she was having trouble observing those signals in kids with profound disabilities. She had tried repeating the kids’ names over and over again, mimicking canonical psychology studies. No luck. She had asked parents to bring in objects their children liked or hated: A beloved toy dinosaur or a dreaded toothbrush, she figured, would provoke enough of an emotional response for her machines to pick up a bodily reaction, too. But she was getting nothing...

Stefanie Blain-Moraes, at the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Music Media and Technology, housed at McGill University.
Photo: Mikaël Theimer for STAT
Blain-Moraes had come to Holland Bloorview looking for a glimpse of human interaction. She’d spent three undergrad years at the University of Toronto, among the equations of the engineering department, and though she loved the certainty of math — “the clockwork,” as she put it — something was missing. “It was very logical: no room for subjective experience, no room for artistry,” she said. She had almost gone to music school. She remembered being 7 and strapped into the backseat of the car, kicking out the fanfare-like rhythms when her mum slid Beethoven’s Ninth into the tape deck. In math competitions, she’d been quick to the buzzer, but in church choir and school band, she’d felt at home. It was only when she heard a talk by a Holland Bloorview researcher that she knew she’d found the engineering equivalent.
Read more...

Source: STAT

Music education in schools: a sharp tool for students | Lifestyles - Cabrini College Loquitur

With constant budget cuts being established for schools, music programs are suffering. The Huffington Post found that there is a lack of music education programs due to the loss of funding.

Photo: Alexandra MonteiroThis causes students to be less engaged and attracted to their schools’ music programs. Little do people know, music in schools and education of music has many benefits for students both inside and outside of the classroom. 

Some benefits to exposing students to music education would include helping students to develop their languages.
 
“While children come into the world ready to decode sounds and words, music education helps enhance those natural abilities,” Mary Luehrisen, executive director of the National Association of Music Merchants, said. It has been proven to show that “growing up in a musically rich environment is often advantageous for children’s language development.”...

According to the National Association of Music Education, studies have shown that, “even when performing with sheet music, student musicians are constantly using their memory to perform.” This can lead to students improving their skills for both inside and outside of schools. Music education allows students to grasp more skills that they continue to use and even help to make students more engaged in school...

“Playing an instrument (more so than just listening to music) is a workout for our brains.” According to Instruments of Joy, “it builds academic achievement by strengthening the areas of cognitive performance.” When students realize they have done something that can be considered challenging, such as learning an instrument or learning how to read music, it gives them a sense of accomplishment and enhances their desire to accomplish more.
Read more... 

Source: Cabrini College Loquitur

This former Deutsche Bank exec gave it all up to run a Brooklyn music school | Impact - Fast Company

This article was originally published on Stanford Business and is republished here with permission.
Chad Cooper left a fast-track career at Deutsche Bank when the struggling Brooklyn Conservatory of Music called his name. Here’s why he did it.

Chad Cooper
Photo: Cole WilsonChad Cooper’s managing director position at Deutsche Bank in New York came with a substantial salary, bonuses, a generous expense account, and business-class travel. “I didn’t have 12 secretaries or people feeding me grapes or anything like that,” says Cooper,  “but it was the life of a banker.”
Two years ago, after a 16-year Wall Street career—and with the blessing of his wife, fellow Stanford Business school graduate Claire Ellis—Cooper, 45, walked away from all that to take the executive director’s job at the nearly insolvent Brooklyn Conservatory of Music. In doing so, he willingly stepped off his chosen career path and into a subterranean office that doubles as instrument storage space in the conservatory’s five-story Victorian building.

“I realized I could continue on in banking for a while,” Cooper says, “or I could jump in and do something that was really calling to me.”...

Cooper is also walking the walk: He recently started taking piano lessons himself.
Read more...

Source: Fast Company

Digital textbooks reduce costs, but do they also reduce learning? | Get Schooled - Atlanta Journal Constitution

Photo: Rick Diguette
Rick Diguette is a frequent Get School contributor on higher ed issues. He is a local writer who retired from college teaching last year.

In this essay, he examines whether the cost savings offered by digital college textbooks – electronic or e-books -- outweigh the potential drawbacks. 

Diguette cites the research showing students just don’t learn as well from screens as they do the printed page. 
By Rick Diguette
Maureen Downey, Education columnist says, It costs a small fortune to go to college these days. 

To save money, colleges are moving away from textbooks to e-books But a retired college professor says studies suggest that for reading assignments of more than a page in length students grasp more from a paper text than a screen.
Photo: AJC FileAccording to the most recent annual report of the Institute for College Access & Success, by the time four-year college graduates walk across the stage to receive their diplomas, they owe on average almost $30,000 in loan debt. As for all those students who drop out before earning the right to take that walk, they typically owe about $14,000. 

That’s why private and public institutions are under increasing pressure to reduce their students’ financial burden. Some have cut tuition costs and stepped up alumni fund-raising efforts, while others have expanded student access to scholarships and grants that don’t have to be paid back. It remains to be seen if these measures will begin to erode the mountain of debt that Forbes magazine has dubbed America’s $1.5 trillion crisis.

Another cost-cutting measure involves the lowly textbook. Students attending expensive private colleges are just as likely as their peers at public institutions to have low-cost, or even no-cost, e-textbook options in some of their classes. The differences between their centuries-old hardcover forebears and today’s e-textbooks are obvious: traditional textbooks weigh a lot more, typically cost a lot more, and are a lot more likely to get lost, damaged, or stolen. E-textbooks, on the other hand, are so easily accessed with a laptop, tablet, or cell phone that they can look like a no-brainer. At least until you do a little digging. 

Studies dating back to the early 1990s have suggested that for reading assignments of more than one page in length ― there will be plenty of those in college ― students appear better at comprehending complexity when reading a paper text as opposed to a screen. These same studies provide another way to look at this: while many of today’s so-called digital natives prefer screen reading and do it faster than when reading paper texts, their understanding of what they’ve read may not be nearly as deep.
Read more...

Source: Atlanta Journal Constitution 

Eastern Kentucky University Professors Connect With Generation Z | WEKU

Faculty at Eastern Kentucky University are finding ways to connect with students known as Generation Z, reports Cheri Lawson, Morning Edition Host and Reporter.

EKU's Dr. Beth Polin prepares students for exam.
Photo: Cheri LawsonThe Gen Z-ers are sometimes referred to as “digital natives.”

On a recent Tuesday at EKU, Tanner Gillispie wearing a plaid shirt and sitting in the third row of Dr. Beth Polin’s class is taking detailed notes for an upcoming exam.

Tanner’s using a pen and notebook, rather than a computer or his phone to take notes because Dr. Polin insists. Tanner says when he’s not in class he’s looking at his phone a lot.

Tanner says, “Outside of the classroom setting I’m probably on my phone, I’d have to say thirty or forty times an hour. Talking about a day I’d say I probably look at my phone seven or eight hundred times.”


The 21-year- old is part of Generation Z, people born from 1995-2010. This generation spans most of an entire educational system.

The Generation Z-ers characterize themselves as loyal, responsible, and determined according to Dr. Corey Seemiller, generational researcher, associate professor at Wright State University, and author of 4 books about Generation Z. Seemiller says, “This is the first generation that has grown up where before they were even born they had a digital footprint.”...

There are strengths and weaknesses with every generation says Assistant Professor of Management at EKU, Dr. Beth Polin. She says this generation tends to trade accuracy for speed since they communicate more through social media. Some people see continuous engagement with social media as a weakness. She says, “The way this translates into a strength is: they want to be involved. Every generation has its big world problems that have to be solved. They don’t want to miss out on being part of the solution.”
Read more... 

Source: WEKU

How Fibonacci Retracement is used in Forex Trading | Basics & Industry - Forex Crunch

In the following post from TradeFW.com broker, you will find out what is Fibonacci Retracement and how to use it for effective trading. 
 

As a forex trader, something which you will doubtless encounter at many points throughout your trading career is Fibonacci retracements. These are a key technical indicator used to identify levels of support and resistance. It is one of the most fundamental and simplistic charting techniques which can be easily implemented by all levels of forex trader.

The History and Fundamentals of Fibonacci Retracement
Fibonacci retracement is based on a sequence of key numbers which were identified in the 13th century by the Italian mathematician, Leonardo Fibonacci. This number sequence and specifically the relationship of the numbers to each other when expressed as a ratio are a key to identifying support and resistance levels in trading.

The sequence of numbers set out by Fibonacci, and adapted by modern mathematicians is 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, 144, and so on. As we can see from a more detailed analysis, each number is the sum of the two preceding numbers. This continues infinitely and is key to deducing the ratios used in retracement.

The Fibonacci ratios are, 23.6%, 38.2%, 50%, 61.8% and 100%. These are used hen dividing the vertical distances on a chart between two points to create a Fibonacci retracement. The “Golden Ratio” is derived by dividing one number in the sequence by its following number. This will always equal approximately 0.618. The other key points are derived in a similar fashion.

Top forex traders who engage in technical analysis, will plot these lines horizontally across a chart in order to identify the key points of support, where the market may retrace to, and levels of resistance which may be reached in future movements...

Conclusion
Ultimately, whether or not traders choose to agree on its effectiveness, Fibonacci retracement is one of the most implemented technical analysis techniques among forex traders today. Within any high-quality forex trading educational program, it is one of the fundamental tools which you will learn how to use.

With a solid foundation in Fibonacci retracement, you can set yourself up to continue learning about other more advanced technical analysis tools. This is a learning process, which, regardless of how you feel about it, can only enhance your knowledge and potential to emerge profitably from the lucrative forex market. 
Read more...

Source: Forex Crunch 

More mathematical conundrums solved with mental arithmetic and poetry too | Lifestyle - Belfast Newsletter

The Reverend Isaiah SteenRegular readers of Roamer’s page have by now become quite well acquainted with the Reverend Isaiah Steen, a Presbyterian minister, mathematician and author of a once-popular school text book called Steen’s Mental Arithmetic.

Frontispiece of the Reverend Steen's book
He published his widely-referenced book, followed by several additional print-runs, when he was a teacher in the Royal Belfast Academical Institution in 1842.

The book is a rich mine of information about all things mathematical, introducing formulas, equations, procedures and techniques for solving numerical problems “in the mind” the author explained “without the use of paper or slate, or anything else on which to perform the operation.”

Some of Rev Steen’s mathematical manipulations seem almost magical today, relying on brain-power rather than our ubiquitous, battery-powered calculators that effortlessly multiply, divide, add and subtract.

Work Out The Number of Shopping Days Till Christmas (2019!)

It’s probably this dependence on modern technology that baffled some folk when faced with the Rev Steen’s Table of Interest, a little mathematical chart that was shared on this page last week.

Based on Professor James Thomson’s calculations, another of Inst’s mathematics doyens, Rev Steen explained in his book that the Table of Interest “may be useful in finding the number of days from any day of one month to any day of any other month.”...

My apologies – I only included Rev Steen’s above-mentioned introduction to the chart last week and omitted his demonstration of how it works.

Rev Steen offered four examples to aid his readers, preceded by a general rule – “the table gives the days between any day of any month and the same day of any other month, which must be increased or diminished by the days in excess or defect.” 

In other words – if you want to know the number of days between today, December 12, and July 12, you just need to look at the December column of the chart and move horizontally across to where the vertical July column intersects. There you’ll find 212 – hey presto, the number of days between now and the 12th! 

I’ve checked it on my calculator and Rev Steen is absolutely right, but that’s from the same date this month to the same date in July.
Read more...

Source: Belfast Newsletter

Are These Incredible Historical Coincidences Actually Due to Synchronicity or Mathematical Probability? | Unexplained Phenomena - Ancient Origins

Coincidences are a concurrence of circumstances which are so unpredictable that they often become associated with the supernatural and paranormal, insist Ashley Cowie, Scottish historian, author and documentary filmmaker.

Tomb of Galileo Galilei in Santa Croce , Florence, Italy. Stephen Hawking was born on the same day Galileo died, 300 years later – a strange historical coincidence? 
Photo: stanthejeep/ CC BY SA 2.5 History is composed with brilliant acts of skill and is also full of bizarre ‘coincidences’ that often seem so incredible that many people have been convinced higher powers were at play.

Mathematicians describe coincidences as probabilities and deem them as inevitable, meaning they can be given odds of occurring. It is when the odds of an occurrence are highest that events are thought of as being coincidental, and if the odds are through the roof then some events can appear almost miraculous.

So far as mathematicians and near miracles are concerned, Stephen Hawking, one of the greatest scientific minds in all of history, would have struggled to work out the chances of his own birthday, January 8, 1942, falling on the 300th anniversary of the death of another great scientist, Galileo Galilei. What is more, his death occurred on Einstein’s 139th birthday, March 14, Pi day, when the calendar reads 3.14.

Before we look at what exactly a coincidence is, scientifically, and why they occur so frequently, let’s first look at some of history’s most perplexing and apparently extraordinary coincidences, that seem to stretch mathematical probability to its very extremes. 
Read more...

Source: Ancient Origins

The 45 New Skills You Can Now Learn on LinkedIn Learning | New Courses - LinkedIn Learning

Each week presents a new opportunity for you and your team to learn the skills necessary to take on the next big challenge, inform Paul Petrone, Editor - LinkedIn Learning.

Photo:  Learning Blog - LinkedIn Learning
And, at LinkedIn Learning, we want to do everything we can to help make that happen.

So, each week, we add to our 13,000+ course library. And this past week was no different, as we added 45 new courses covering everything from real estate analysis to motion graphics to data science. 

The new courses now available on LinkedIn Learning are:
Read more...  

Source: Learning Blog - LinkedIn Learning

Why reading 100 books a year won’t make you successful | Medium.com

Originally published at www.jotform.com.Reading is trending, notes Aytekin Tank, Editor of The Startup and JotForm.


The internet’s taken something uncool and given it a makeover.
Reading is the new kale: worth stomaching because it’s Good For Us.
So good, in fact, that we should do as much of it as we can. More is more! Everyone should be reading one book a week — no, wait, one book a day.
That’s why Mark Zuckerberg, Bill Gates and Elon Musk are successful, after all.The more we read, the smarter we’ll get.
But where to find the time? We have to do it faster, faster, and faster still!...
As the professor and eye tracking researcher Keith Rayner explains, techniques like simultaneously reading large segments of the page aren’t biologically or psychologically possible, due to the limitation of our foveal viewing area.
An entire page can’t be read at once. Zig-zagging down one page doesn’t work. The human eye just isn’t up to it...
And according to UCLA psychologist Patricia Greenfield, when the brain skims, less attention and time is allocated to slower, more time-consuming processes, like inference, critical analysis and empathy.
In other words, we aren’t giving ourselves enough time to grasp complexity or develop opinions of our own...
Why do we read, anyway? 
Consider three types of reading:
  • The first is passive. Scrolling on Facebook, flicking through a magazine in a doctor’s room, tapping away on Twitter. This reading happens to you. 
  • The second is practical. Reading for a purpose. Because we want — or need — to learn something. At school, college, or for personal improvement. 
  • The third is pleasurable. Not just fiction or magazines or fluffy escapism. Reading for pleasure doesn’t have a category: it’s subjective. It happens when something makes you tick: an article, a novel, an autobiography.
Reading because you want to, not because you feel you should.Read more...
Source: Medium

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